Interviews News

"Rituals and witchcraft are in my blood, and I was going through something that needed to be conquered" Vernon Jane talk to TLMT

Vernon Jane talk to the Last Mixed Tape about the meaning behind the record, the making of and what it means to them.

Vernon Jane are set to make their mark on 2020 with the release of their much-anticipated debut album The Ritual Of Love Making which is due out April 3rd. Emily Jane and Joe Curtis from the band recently spoke to the Last Mixed Tape about the themes behind the record, the making of and what it means to them.

“We keep changing, we keep growing, and so does our sound” Emily states, speaking on the decision to write and record an album of all new material for their debut rather than drawing from past releases. She continues, “The way we write is in phases, this was a whole new one thematically and we felt it deserved its own platform.”

Guitarist Joe Curtis adds “It’s also nice to have that old idea of an album being its own body of work that can exist for and of itself”

Indeed, there’s conceptual thread that runs right through The Ritual Of Love Making, one which plays into the thematic core of the record and the songwriting. “The four parts of the album are based on a ritual. It’s an exploration of personal relationships and an emotional body of work” remarks Emily. “I like looking at those things like something I can conquer. Rituals and witchcraft are in my blood and I was going through something that needed to be conquered”

“So, part one is cleanse which has an aggressive energy” Emily explains, “Part two is sink, and that’s about sinking into what you are afraid of feeling. Part three is drown, this is essentially the part you die (laughs). And finally, there’s part four which is float, this is like being reborn and just not giving a fuck”.

“Part three, the part were you die, has an unexpected about of bangers in it.” Joe comments. “Thematically they fit, but still, they’re bangers (laughs)”

With the release of ‘Daddy Issues’, the first single to be taken from the album, it’s clear this dynamic energy plays into the overall sound of the record. Commenting on this synthesis between the theme and sound of The Ritual Of Love Making, Curtis says “Once Emily brought us the theme, we knew it was something to latch on to. And because how it all matches us with where we are now, it can be fleeting so you got to jump on it. Once your in the vibe. That made the recording really exciting too.”

Talking about the process of bringing her songs to the band to interpret when making the album, Emily adds “I became way more open with my songwriting. That took over ten years of knowing everyone before I could say, remember that really shit thing that happened? Well, this song is about that. And whether its a drum beat or a guitar part from Joe, the whole band really locked into that”

“Listening to the recordings knowing the energy that went into making it, that some of those songs we just went for it, is really exciting to listen to” Joe continues. “And you hope that comes across, that people know that the whole vibe is from us making it in a room as a band.”

With Vernon Jane’s debut currently being put to vinyl as the band ready to play thier biggest headline show to date at the Academy this March, Emily Jane looks back on the road that’s led to this point and the debut album that is soon to be released, saying “Even though I was heavily involved in the mixing, and I’ve heard the songs thousands of times its still very emotional. There’s still songs I can’t listen to without crying, which isn’t very a very rockstar thing, but I cried when I was in the studio making them. Listening to it you feel what you felt when made it. There’s something cathartic about that. And when I get the prints back and listen to the vinyl in full I’ll be able to box that away and say that was a moment I went through and move on to the next.

The Ritual Of Love Making by Vernon Jane out on April 3rd. The band will play the Academy on March 6th, tickets are €17. 45 via ticketmaster.ie. Photo credit: Roisin Murphy O’Sullivan.

%d bloggers like this: