I Heart the Monster Hero – Workman’s Club

I The Monste Hero photo by Vincent Gallagher

Dublin psych-pop outfit I Heart the Monster Hero celebrated the launch of their début album Rhythm & Pals in the Workman’s Club last Friday night.

With the venue suitably decorated in bunting and dangling piñata’s for the occasion. A pair of strong performances from Night Trap and the Holy Sparks set the scene for I Heart the Monster Hero’s joyously manic set.

Conveying the visceral tone of Rhythm & Pals, the launch show brought everything that is so unique about I Heart the Monster Hero to the fore. Pulling together the jolting melting pot of sound that forms the album, the band intricately translated the sheer force of their studio work. While also maintaining the frantic post-modernist style of the record both sonically and visually.

Renditions of ‘Toni Bailey’ and ‘Do Dah’ captured the palpable pace of I Heart the Monster Hero’s music while a slow-burning performance of ‘Madeline’ gave a sense of aspect to the show dynamically. This proved an important addition, as it allowed the band to showcase their ability to move quickly from great washes of fuzz-laden pop mania to gentle repose, while still remaining cohesive.

As the set continued the night seemed to take on a more personal aesthetic. In between piñata games (using a guitar) and blistering performances of ‘Send Good Vibes Only’, the sense of celebration and achievement felt by the group was clear. Emanating out into the audience who responded in kind (resulting in two impromptu encores), the vibrant nature and bursting atmosphere of the show began to mirror the bustling unbridled creativity at the centre of Rhythm & Pals.

With their set in the Workman’s Club I Heart the Monster Hero illustrated how effortlessly the five-piece can translate the vivid sonic spectrum of Rhythm & Pals into the live realm, while also identifying themselves as one of the most irrepressibly singular bands on the Irish music scene. A simply infectious live show.

Rhythm & Pals is out now. Read the Last Mixed Tape’s review of the album here.